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The Australian government has been forcing people seeking asylum into destitution. Future changes are likely to make thousands of highly vulnerable people in our communities homeless and desperate. Community groups and organisations around the country cannot cope. This is a humanitarian crisis in the making.

Read what people seeking asylum, and people who support them, have told us about what is happening here.

Take action by signing our petition to Malcolm Turnbull today. If you want to get involved, you can find all our campaign resources here.

[I]f We Want To Compare Ourselves With People Who Came Before And Got Their Permanent Residency. They Could Choose Their Paths Quickly. They Went And Studied And Became Successful In Different Areas. This Limbo Is Really Getting To Us. It’s Been 3.5 Years. We Can’t Study, Even When We Have Work Rights Which We Got Very Recently, We Can’t Find A Job Because We Can’t Speak English.
[I]f We Want To Compare Ourselves With People Who Came Before And Got Their Permanent Residency. They Could Choose Their Paths Quickly. They Went And Studied And Became Successful In Different Areas. This Limbo Is Really Getting To Us. It’s Been 3.5 Years. We Can’t Study, Even When We Have Work Rights Which We Got Very Recently, We Can’t Find A Job Because We Can’t Speak English.
Some Asylum Seekers Who Have Been In The Country For Four Or Five Years, And In My Experience Some Are Not Connected To Any Kind Of Support Agency, They Don’t Have A Case Worker Any More. They Don’t Have Any Type Of Professional Support. I Probably Wouldn’t Even Know If I Got Bad Advice From A Migration Lawyer That There Are Avenues To Go Down. So, For Those People It’s Difficult For Them To Know That These Services Are Even Out There. I Feel Like There Would Be A Whole Group Of People Who Are Being Held In This Kind Of Certainty With No Kind Of Support. It’s Very Depressing.
Too Hard Quote
I Was Happy About Five Or Six Years Ago. I Was Always Laughing, Didn’t Care About Anything. I Thought That One Day I Would Get A Visa. Now, Everyone Is Always Asking Me ‘Why Are You So Upset?’ I Can’t Laugh. ... Now, I Don’t Know Why I Am Here. I Don’t Know. I Lost My Way. I Lost My Dream. I Lost My Life. I Wish Everyone Gets A Good Life, Because We Need The Life. We Need A Life. We Don’t Have Anything. … We Are All Like Dead. We Are Like Dead, Everyone Is Dead Here. No One Is Happy Here. No One Knows How To Be Happy.

#ChangeThePolicy of cruelty, save the SRSS

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There is a support program for people seeking asylum in Australia called the Status Resolution Support Service or SRSS. It provides a basic living allowance, casework, and access to torture and trauma counselling.

While the support is minimal it is still lifesaving for many people.

The Government is now in the process of taking away this vital support and unveiling a new, reduced support model of SRSS. From June 4th, thousands of people will be exited from the program and are expected to find a job. The only assistance they will get is access to a computer at a local employment agency.

Can you join or campaign calling on Malcolm Turnbull to save these life-saving supports for people seeking asylum and ensure a #RoofOverMyHead ?

Learn more about the challenges faced by people in our community

While the changes to income support are new, the destitution of people seeking asylum is not new. Read these reports to understand the challenges facing people seeking asylum in surviving, getting housing, and getting work.

What Do We Know About People Seeking Asylum And Employment?

What do we know about people seeking asylum and employment?

Misinformation about people seeking asylum and employment is widespread. A journal article, 'People seeking asylum in Australia and their access to employment: just what do we know?', examines what we do and do not know about access to employment for people seeking asylum.
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Temporary Protection, Permanent Uncertainty: The Experience Of Refugees Living On Temporary Protection Visas

Temporary protection, permanent uncertainty: The experience of refugees living on temporary protection visas

Greg Marston’s 2003 report analyses access and equity issues relating to refugees on Temporary Protection Visas (TPVs), with an emphasis on employment, income support, housing and health services. The findings of the report are based on a study conducted by RMIT’s Centre for Applies Social Research (CASR), which involved interviews of 51 refugees in Melbourne, and parts of rural Victoria where significant numbers of Iraqi and Afghani refugees have resettled. In addition, service providers, health providers, and refugee advocates in these areas were interviewed to share their views on the TPVs barriers.
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State Of The Nation 2017: Refugees And People Seeking Asylum In Australia

State of the Nation 2017: Refugees and people seeking asylum in Australia

The world is in the midst of an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. Yet Australia’s approach in recent years has been to punish people seeking asylum, while increasing the numbers of refugees it resettles. This contrasting approach threatens the long and proud history Australia has of successful integration of refugee communities. This report reflects what we have heard from refugees and people seeking asylum, and the people supporting them
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