Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on RedditPrint this pageShare this
Two men sheltering in boat

On this page you can find updates about our work on asylum policy.

Latest news

How you can help people who’ve been to Nauru or Manus (#letthemstay)

The Australian Government has recently announced changes that will leave potentially hundreds of people transferred from Nauru or Manus Island without any financial support or housing. You can help by donating money to the following organisations, who are likely to be ones on the frontline helping these people survive in Australia.
read more

Unwelcome visitors: Challenges faced by people visiting immigration detention

In recent years, people who visit immigration detention have expressed concerns about changes to rules and practices that have limited access for people visiting in detention. The Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA), through its Detention Research Project, has interviewed visitors from across Australia to identify and record those challenges, and to make recommendations for addressing them. This report also records the significant role people who visit immigration detention make to those in detention. We outline in this report the critical role they play in supporting people in detention, the value they bring to these most vulnerable people, and the challenges they face in doing so.
read more

Recent changes in Australian refugee policy

Recent years have seen numerous changes to Australia’s refugee and asylum seeker policies, largely as a political response to an increase in the number of asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat (51,637 arrivals in the five years to December 2013) and a consequent increase in deaths at sea between Indonesia and Australia (at least 862 deaths recorded over the same period).[1] Both of Australia’s major political parties have attempted to address this issue through deterrence-based policies which block access to protection in Australia and impose penalties on people who arrive by boat. This document summarises some of the more recent policy changes.
read more

Scholarships for people seeking asylum and refugees on temporary visas

As part of our Education for All Campaign the Refugee Council has been working with universities to provide scholarships to people seeking asylum. Unlike holders of permanent humanitarian visas, people seeking asylum and refugees on temporary protection visas are not eligible for programs and concessions designed to assist students with financing tertiary education. This page lists universities that are now offering scholarships.
read more
Thinking Beyond Offshore Processing: Key Recommendations From The Refugee Council Of Australia

Thinking Beyond Offshore Processing: Key recommendations from the Refugee Council of Australia

This paper explains our views on the path beyond offshore processing, bringing together existing recommendations in some of our key reports, including: Australia’s response to a world in crisis (March 2016, ‘Australia’s response’), Eroding our identity as a generous nation: Community views on Australia’s treatment of people seeking asylum (December 2015, ‘Eroding our identity’) and Improving Refugee Protection in Asia-Pacific: How Australia can make a practical difference (July 2015, ‘Improving refugee protection’).
read more
Speaking Up About Suicide And Self-harm

Speaking up about suicide and self-harm

In July 2016, the Refugee Council of Australia spoke at a major national conference about the effect of asylum policies on the mental health of people seeking asylum. The National Suicide Prevention Conference, held by Suicide Prevention Australia (SPA), was held in Canberra between 24-27 July 2016.
read more
Detention Research Project

Detention Research Project

The project aims to identify systemic issues of concern relating to detention in Australia.It will research emerging trends and patterns in Australian immigration detention facilities. This information will be used to help us advocate on issues relating to detention.
read more

Statelessness in Australia

Although the right to a nationality is a fundamental human right, stateless people are not citizens of any country. They face significant difficulties in travelling, accessing services, finding employment and…

read more