Pathways to education

This audit of educational pathways for refugee students into higher education was developed by the University of Newcastle as part of the (Re)claiming social capital: Improving language and cultural pathways for refugee students into Australian higher education project, in partnership with Curtin and Macquarie Universities, and funded by the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training.
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FutureAbility Project Report 2016: Multicultural communities getting NDIS-ready

Settlement Services International (SSI) have developed a project to help people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities get access to disability services. The project is called FutureAbility, and is funded by the Department of Family and Community Services (FACS). In 2016, SSI released a report summarising the process and findings of the project’s first four phases.
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Giving people seeking asylum the chance to get work

Given the Chance for Asylum Seekers is a Brotherhood of St Laurence employment program for people seeking asylum. The program's services includes assessing their job readiness, help with job applications, access to training, interview preparation and understanding Australian workplaces. By partnering with employers, the program also creates new jobs and training opportunities. The program has helped many individuals get their first job in Australia. The first phase of this program has recently been evaluated by the Brotherhood of St Laurence.
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The Department reports: the annual report of the Department of Immigration 2016-2017

The year 2016-2017 has been a turbulent period for Australian refugee policy, as evidenced by the recent Department of Immigration and Border Protection's 2016-17 annual report. The report provides key statistics and information on changes to policy and practice during the past year.
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Why Hazaras are in danger in Afghanistan: Expert opinion

On 23 July 2016, a peaceful protest by Hazaras in Afghanistan ended in tragedy. At least 80 people died, and more than 230 were injured, in a bomb blast. Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack. In the opinion of a leading expert on Afghanistan, Professor William Maley of the Australian National University, this attack has profound implications.
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